July 31, 2014

Re-submitting

We all want second and even third chances of trying to succeed.  But when it comes to revising a manuscript, a writer may only have one more chance to get it right. 

I believe everyone deserves to know why a story or an article is not ready for publication. Generally, if I see a manuscript for Kid's Imagination Train that has promise and needs a little editing, I’ll point out the areas which need attention.  For example, I might suggest getting closer to the expected word count, or finding another research source, or presenting the conflict earlier.  These are things a writer can easily fix.  I’ll send an email offering to read the revision.  Most writers are eager to comply to perfect their work.

But sometimes, the issue is the mood of the story.  Kid's Imagination Train does not accept violent or scary stories.  If we receive stories such as these, we still offer a chance to revise.  In some cases, writers will re-work the story and the revision will be accepted. 

Other times, writers refuse to make significant changes.  They re-submit the same story, but with fewer words. When this happens, their work will not be accepted.  I will tell them why:  KIT publishes whimsical, upbeat stories.  Yet a few writers can't accept the fact that their story has been rejected.  They want another chance.  They even feel entitled to send multiple unsolicited revisions. 

Sending a revision without an editor's invitation is discourteous and unprofessional. Many writers may never know the reason why a piece is rejected. Even fewer get an opportunity for a revision.  So receiving an editor’s opinion and getting a chance to edit is rare.  If however, an editor indicates that she must pass on the submission after seeing a revision, then writers have two choices.  They can either send the editor a new story that better fits her needs or they can find another market that accepts pieces similar to the story they have written.   
















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