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The next Children's Writer's World post will be on June 15th.

August 24, 2014

KIT's Writing Contest for Kids

All aboard!  Kid's Imagination Train is sponsoring a writing contest for children ages 7 - 12.

Here are the rules:

There is no entry fee.  Create a holiday or winter-themed story up to 500 words.  The story should be typed or neatly printed.  On the right hand corner of the first page include your name, age, and home and email address.

Submit online at kidsimaginationtrainmag@gmail.com  Type "Contest" and the title of your story in the subject line.  The stories can also be mailed to:

KIT c/o Randi Lynn Mrvos, Editor
4637 Spring Creek Drive
Lexington, KY  40515

Be sure to keep a copy of your story.  All submissions must be received by October 1, 2014.  The KIT editorial staff will review the stories.  Notification will be emailed approximately six weeks after the closing date of the contest.

The prize:  The winning story will be published in the 2014 KIT December issue.           The winner will also get to choose a book that has been reviewed on KIT.  Go to www.kidsimaginationtrain.com and click on Contest to see the list of books.

Stumped on ideas?  Here are a few titles that you can use or that might get your creative juices flowing:  

"Snowman has a Wish"
"A White and Wondrous World"
"The Magical Snow Angel"
"The Loneliest Snowflake"
"A Gift for Santa"

To read the latest issue of Kid's Imagination Train visit:  www.kidsimaginationtrain.com

August 15, 2014

Write Every Day?

You probably know the adage: “Write every day.”  Because I love to write, that's not hard to do. But not long ago, my writing routine was abruptly interrupted.  I came down with some weird mysterious flu.  The chills, a migraine, and nausea kept me from writing (and cooking for my family, going to the hair salon, taking care of the cat, and doing household chores).  I was miserable and bed-ridden.  All I could think about was staying warm and not throwing up.  After several doses of Imitrex and Tylenol, plus anti-nausea medicine, I was back on my feet in five hours—until another headache and a wave of nausea hit again.  So…back to bed. 

Through it all, my cat stayed by my side.  I had heard that dogs know when their owners are sick and will stay close by.  I never knew cats would.  And yet, Ollie did.  Okay, I was using one of his favorite nap-time comforters, but I like to think he really wanted to be close to comfort me.  And he did, snuggling and purring.  Later that evening, I was up and at ‘em.  I couldn’t eat much, and I didn’t want to think about anything, even writing. 



Two days later, I was ready to tackle some editing.  It was a great feeling, sitting in front of the computer with my work before me. After being sick, my mind was clear. I had more drive and energy.    

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t recommend that anyone get sick to find a new zeal for writing.  But I noticed that in getting away from the computer keyboard was beneficial.  I’ll have to think hard about the “writing every day” approach.  Maybe taking a break from time to time is a good thing.  For me, putting writing on hold for a few days gave me a new appreciation for what I love to do.   

Don't forget to check out the August issue of Kid's Imagination Train, now a flipbook, at: www.kidsimaginationtrain.com