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October 13, 2017

Please Write a Review

Did you know book reviews directly influence the sale of books?  That's why it's so important to get reviews.  However, as an author, getting reviews are easier said than done.

I've asked friends, family, work acquaintances, classmates, picture book bloggers, and the list goes on and on.  

Many have taken the time to read Maggie and the Summer Vacation Show-and-Tell and post an Amazon review.  And for that, I'm sincerely honored and grateful. 

So, dear followers.  Please leave a comment or email Rlmrvos@gmail.com and request a free copy of Maggie.  One or two sentences is all you'd need to write. 

Some people are not sure what to say and that holds them back.  Have no fears.  It's easy:  write if you liked (or disliked) the story, the themes, or the illustrations.  Write about  the discussion guide or Charlie's story which appears at the end of the book.  Write if you think kids will like the book. 

It can't be stressed enough the value of reviews, and for this reason, this blog post will be published on The Maggie Project Blog, too.  This message bears repeating.

I urge you to reach out not only to me, but to other authors.  Write a review.  The instructions are easy and can be found here:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201145120


Please know that your words are important.  Even a few words can make a huge difference.



October 1, 2017

Post-Publication Blues

When I gave birth to my daughter, I was lucky that I never got the postpartum blues.  But after the "birth" of my book, the post-publication book blues set in.

Everyone assumes that when you get a book published, life is grand. They think that now, for you, a publisher author, nothing will ever get you down again.

But that's not true.  After your book is published, a little depression may settle in.  For instance:

You may be wit's end trying to get reviews because reviews sell books. You might be trying to figure out new marketing schemes.  You may have to get out there in front of fans at book signings and on television even if you are an introvert (and most of us writers are introverts).

You may find that you can't give up wearing a thick skin (which you developed during those days of submitting and then getting rejections) when friends don't write you to congratulate you, when business managers won't return your phone calls and emails, when newspaper reporters fail to take interest.

You may be constantly thinking about sales, and if you're not, then someone will ask:  How many books have you sold?

So writers have a lot on their minds after the publication of a book and it's not always pretty. However, that's part of publication and we must learn to shrug off the blues because it can make us feel miserable when we should be rejoicing.

What can we do about these post-publication woes?  We can concentrate on the GOOD things that come with publication:

the positive reviews
the encouragement of a spouse
the throng of people coming to your book signing
a librarian who wants you to do a school visit
a child who wants your autograph
the conversations with friends who tell you your writing touched them in a profound way
flipping the pages of a book that was once merely a manuscript

We can't make the post-publication worries go away.  But we can choose to redirect our focus away from those worries.

When we can concentrate on the good things, we may find we have a lot to be thankful for.  And we may find that after publication...life can be grand.